Complete Your Final Order

Completing the Final Decree for Legal Separation with Children

You filed for separation, gave your spouse time to respond and got a Court order scheduling a final hearing. Now you must fill out a final set of forms before your separation is finalized. Learn more about the forms you need and how to fill them out.

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Understanding the Basics

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Completing your separation decree

Before your final hearing, you must complete a set of forms for the Court to approve. This is called the “final decree.”

Follow these steps to fill out your final decree:

  1. Download the forms.
  2. Understand your scheduling order.
  3. Complete each section of the decree.
  4. Submit all documents to the Court's Compliance Office.

The forms explain the facts of your case and what will happen after the separation. You usually must submit them to the Court's Compliance Office at least 21 days before your final hearing.

Once the Judge reviews and approves the forms, your legal separation will be final.

You also may see the final decree called the:

  • Final judgment
  • Final judgment and decree
  • Final paperwork

If the Court has set a final hearing with the Judge in your case, you should get a Court document called an “Order Scheduling Final Hearing,” or scheduling order, with the date and time of the final hearing. You must fill out the final decree and submit it to the Court's Compliance Office before your final hearing.

Download the forms

You can download and fill out the forms you need to file a final decree for legal separation without children on this site. When you fill out the forms:

  • Use a computer, if possible. It will be easier to complete the forms on a computer. If you can only use a phone, print the forms first and then fill them in neatly by hand.
  • Write neatly. The Court will accept neat, handwritten forms. Use a blue pen, if possible. Print neatly.
  • Do not cross out any information. If you make a mistake writing by hand, use whiteout and then neatly enter the correct information.
  • Give details. You must give the Court all the information it needs to finalize your separation.
  • Take your time. Read each part carefullyIt takes most people a long time to complete the final decree. Pace yourself and take breaks when you need them.

You can find information you need to fill out the forms in:

  • Your case “docket.” Search for your case on the Montgomery County Clerk of Court’s website. Click on “docket” to find important dates, documents and information in your case.
  • Your scheduling order. The Court sends a document that gives the date of your final hearing. Look for the words “Order Scheduling Final Hearing.” This is your scheduling order.
  • The complaint for legal separation. The complaint is the first paperwork filed in the separation. Look for the words “Complaint for Legal Separation” at the bottom of your docket.

If you have a lawyer, your lawyer should complete the final decree for you. If you don’t have one, it may be helpful to find a lawyer.

If you have a low income and are having a hard time with the forms, you may be able to get help from a volunteer lawyer. Call (937) 496-7766 or email [email protected] for more information. You may need to leave your name and phone number so a representative can get back to you.

Read this article to understand your scheduling order and to find details about each part of the final decree.

Understand your scheduling order

Your scheduling order is a Court document that gives the date of your final hearing.

Look for a document called “Order Scheduling Final Hearing.” This is your scheduling order.

You can find the following information in your scheduling order:

  • Plaintiff
  • Defendant
  • Case number (or "Case no.”)
  • Judge
  • Date of your final hearing
  • Time of your final hearing
  • If “service was completed”
  • If your case is “non-contested”
  • When to submit your final paperwork (usually at least 21 days before your final hearing)

Pay attention to the date of your final hearing and when to submit the final decree to the Court. You can also learn about getting ready for a hearing.

Note: Don’t fill out a final decree until the Court instructs you to. If your spouse files an answer, your case is “contested,” and the Court may order a pretrial or settlement conference. Read each order from the Court carefully.

Complete each section of the decree

Once the Court has set a final hearing, fill out the final decree. Note:

  • Read each part carefully. The decree includes several sections. There are many parts asking for details about your case. Take your time to understand what to enter. Give the Court all the information it’s asking for.
  • Some parts won’t apply to your case. You can enter "N/A" or "not applicable" in the fields that don't apply to your case. Be sure to fill out all parts that do apply to your case.
  • Find details about each section. Click on the following links for details about each section.

Note: This article provides a general outline of how to complete the final decree. However, each case is different. Some of the information may not apply to you. You may need to take different steps than the ones outlined here.

Final Judgment for Legal Separation with Children (first page)

This page is used to give basic information about your case. Enter your information, including:

  • Plaintiff: This is the person who filed for separation. If you filed for separation, you are the Plaintiff. If the other person filed, they are the Plaintiff.
  • Defendant: This is other person. If you filed for separation, the other person is the Defendant. If the other person filed for separation, you are the Defendant.
  • Case number: This is the number the Court assigned to your case, also written as “case no.” It starts with the year your case was filed and is stamped on each document filed in your case.
  • Judge: This is the name of the Judge assigned to your case.

In the first paragraph:

  • This matter came on for final hearing on: Enter the date of your final hearing. You can find this date on your scheduling order.
  • Judge: Check the box and enter the name of the Judge assigned to your case. You can find the Judge's name on your scheduling order.
  • Plaintiff’s Complaint for Legal Separation filed on: Enter the date the original complaint was filed (not today’s date). You can find the complaint filing date on the docket or the complaint itself.
  • Defendant’s Counterclaim filed on: Only use this section if there is a counterclaim. If one person filed for separation and the other person filed a counterclaim, enter the date they filed the counterclaim. You may not have a counterclaim in your case. For example, non-contested cases don’t have a counterclaim.
  • Upon the following: If there was some other filing in your case, list it here. You may not have another filing, for instance in a non-contested case.
Findings

This section is used to explain facts that are part of your case.

A. Check all that apply:

  • Defendant was properly served: After one person filed for separation, the other person (the Defendant) was served with the papers. If your scheduling order says “service was completed,” the Court determined the Defendant was properly served.
  • Defendant’s waiver of service: The Defendant has given up the right to be served with Court papers. You may not have a waiver of service in your case. If you do, you should see “Waiver of Service” on the docket.
  • Defendant filed an Answer: The Defendant responded to the separation papers by filing an Answer. If your scheduling order says “non-contested,” the Court determined that the Defendant did not file an answer.
  • Defendant failed to file an Answer or plead: The Defendant received the separation papers but never responded in Court. This applies if your scheduling order says “service was completed” and the case was “set as a non-contested divorce or legal separation.”
  • Plaintiff replied to Counterclaim: The person who filed responded after the other person filed their own claims for separation. If your scheduling order says “non-contested,” there is no counterclaim.
  • Plaintiff failed to reply to Counterclaim: The person who filed for separation did not respond to the other person’s claims for separation. If your scheduling order says “non-contested,” there is no counterclaim.

B. Present at the hearing were the:

Check any boxes that apply:

  • Plaintiff: The person who filed for separation.
  • Defendant: The other person.
  • Counsel for the Plaintiff: The lawyer of the person who filed for separation.
  • Counsel for the Defendant: The lawyer of the other person.

C. At the time the Complaint and/or Counterclaim was/were filed:

  • Plaintiff was a resident of this county for at least 90 days: Check this box if the person who filed for separation lived in Montgomery County for at least 90 days before filing.
  • Defendant was a resident of this county: Check this box if the other person lived in Montgomery County when the separation papers were filed.

E. Plaintiff and Defendant were married to one another on:

F. The legal separation is the date of: Check the correct box to show the date you want your separation to start: 

  • final hearing: This means your separation will start the same day as your final hearing.
  • as specified: This means you want your separation to start on a different date than your final hearing. Explain when you want it to end.

G. Check all that apply regarding child(ren) and enter the names and dates of birth for child(ren) as applicable. 

H. Select one:

  • Neither Plaintiff nor Defendant is in the military: This means neither of you are serving in the U.S. military.
  • The Plaintiff and/or Defendant is in the military: One or both of you are serving in the U.S. military but still can respond in the separation case. Check the correct box to show who is in the military.

I. Check all the “grounds” for separation that are listed in the complaint for separation. For example, grounds commonly include that the Plaintiff and Defendant are incompatible.

Check the docket if you don’t have a copy of the complaint. Find your docket by searching for your case on the Montgomery County Clerk of Court’s website and clicking on “docket.”

J. Check all that apply:

  • Plaintiff... full and complete disclosure: The person who filed for separation has told the Court about all their property, assets, debts, income and expenses.
  • Defendant... full and complete disclosure: The other person has told the Court about all their property, assets, debts, income and expenses.

K. Check and complete all statements that that apply.

L. Complete applicable information regarding attorney fees, if any.

M. Include any additional findings you'd like the Court to make. It’s common for none to apply.

First: Legal Separation Granted

Check any boxes that apply to your case. It’s common for none to apply.

Second: Property

This section is used to explain how you will divide any property you have. You can use extra paper if you need it.

Use the correct sections to show who is keeping what:

  • Plaintiff shall have the following” sections show what property will go to the person who filed for separation.
  • Defendant shall have the following” sections show what property will go to the other person.

Fill in each section that applies, depending on what kind of property you have:

  • H. Other orders regarding transfers of property: You can use this section to address property issues, such as title transfers.

Real Estate

If you own a house and are selling it, explain:

  • Who is responsible for selling it.
  • How long that person has to sell it.
  • How you will divide the money you get from the sale.
  • Who will make mortgage, tax or repair payments before the house is sold.
  • The full description of the property from the deed. (Keep reading for how to get a copy of your deed.)

If you own a house and one of you is keeping it, explain:

  • Who will get the house.
  • When the other person will move out (if you still live together).
  • Whose names are on the mortgage.
  • When the mortgage will be refinanced to one person’s name only.
  • Whose names are on the deed.
  • If you are using a quit claim deed to remove the other person’s ownership or dower rights in the property. Also attach a copy of the quit claim deed.
  • The full description of the property from the deed. (See below for how to get a copy of your deed.)

To get a copy of your deed:

  • Go to the Montgomery County Recorder’s online document search.
  • Enter your name (or your spouse’s name).
  • Find your deed.
  • Click on the camera image.
  • Copy the full description of the property. The full description includes the paragraphs that come after “the following real property” plus the parcel number.
  • Print a copy of the deed. From the recorder’s website, hit the print icon. Then print the document or save it as a PDF.

Automobiles

For each vehicle you list, state:

  • The year, make and model.
  • Whose name is on the title.

If both of you are on the title, you will need a title transfer, and you should also state:

  • The VIN (Vehicle Identification Number).
  • When you will transfer the title.
  • If you need to refinance.
  • The date you will refinance by.

Retirement Accounts

If you are dividing an account, explain:

  • If one of you is responsible for getting a Qualified Domestic Relations Order (QDRO) or Division of Property Order (DOPO) to divide the account. 
  • How long the person has to divide it.

Orders dividing retirement benefits are complicated. It may be helpful to find a lawyer to determine what kind of order you need.

Learn more about dividing property.

Third: Debt

This section is used to explain how you will divide your debts after the separation.

Include any credit cards, mortgage loans, car loans or other debts. You can use extra paper if you need it.

Use the correct sections to show who will pay what:

  • A. Plaintiff debts: The person who filed for separation will be responsible for the debts you list here. The other person will no longer be responsible for them (and will be held “harmless from all claims”).
  • B. Defendant debts: The other person will be responsible for the debts you list here. The person who filed for separation will no longer be responsible for them (and will be held “harmless from all claims”).

Learn more about dividing debt.

Fourth: Spousal Support

This section is used to explain whether either of you will pay spousal support – money to the other person after the separation.

A. Spousal Support Not Awarded

Check this box if neither of you will pay spousal support to the other after the separation.

B. Spousal Support Awarded 

Use this section if you want spousal support in your case.

Check the boxes that apply to your case:

  • Plaintiff shall pay Defendant: This means the person who filed for separation will pay spousal support to the other person.
  • Defendant shall pay Plaintiff: This means the other person will pay spousal support to the person who filed for separation.

Also enter:

  • amount of $___ per month: This is how much spousal support the person should get each month.
  • commencing on: This is the date spousal support payments should start.
  • due on the: This is when spousal support payments should be due each month. For example, sometimes payments are due on the “first” day of the month.

C. Termination of Spousal Support

You can use this section to give reasons spousal support could end early.

Check any boxes that apply:

  • cohabitation comparable to marriage: The person getting spousal support should stop getting it if they move in with their significant other.
  • remarriage of the person receiving support: The person getting spousal support should stop getting it if they marry someone else.
  • Other (specify): Any other reasons why spousal support could end early.

D. Method of Payment of Spousal Support

Checking this box means:

  • The person ordered to pay spousal support will make payments to the Ohio Child Support Payment Central.
  • Payments will be administered by the Montgomery County Child Support Enforcement Agency (CSEA).
  • The CSEA will withhold money from the person’s paycheck.

E. Reservation of Jursidiction

Check any boxes that apply.

F. Other orders regarding spousal support (specify)

You can use this section if you want to explain anything else the final separation judgment should say about spousal support.

G. Arrearage

This section applies only if you had temporary orders for spousal support. Only check a box if it applies to your case:

  • will survive this judgment entry: This means overdue spousal support from temporary orders still must be paid, even after the separation is final.
  • will not survive this judgment entry: This means overdue spousal support from temporary orders won’t be owed anymore once the separation is final.
  • Other: This section can be used to explain anything else about overdue spousal support.
Sixth: Allocation of Parental Rights and Responsibilities

Complete this section only if you and your spouse have not submitted and attached a parenting plan or shared parenting plan to the Court. 

This section is used to explain parent rights and responsibilities for each of your children.

A. Parental Rights and Responsibilities

If one of you will live with the child and be the residential parent and legal custodian, check the correct box to show who: 

  • Plaintiff shall be the residential parent and legal custodian: The parent who filed for separation will be the residential parent and legal custodian.
  • Defendant shall be the residential parent and legal custodian: The other parent will be the residential parent and legal custodian.

Also check which of the following boxes applies to your case:

  • Each parent shall have parenting time: This means that the non-residental parent will have parenting time (visitation) with the child that is living with the other parent. 
  • Plaintiff/Defendant shall not having parenting time: If there is a reason that the non-residential parent should not have parenting time, check this box and explain. 

Note: Montgomery County has a Standard Order of Parenting Time that most people use. If you want a different schedule, you must write a parenting time schedule and include it with the forms you submit to the Court.

B. Relocation Notice

Use this section to explain what would happen if one of you moves. In Ohio, the residential parent must notify the Court if they plan to move. The Court then notifies the other parent. It could hold a hearing about the parenting time schedule.

Check any boxes that apply to your case:

  • Non-residential parent shall inform: This means the non-residential parent will tell the Court and the other parent in writing if they move or change their phone number.
  • Residential parent shall inform: This means the residential parent will tell the Court and the other parent in writing if they move or change their phone number.
  • Other orders: This section can be used to explain anything else about a parent moving that should be part of the separation.

C. Records Access Notice

Use this section to explain any limits to the non-residential parent’s access to the child’s records, like their medical or school records. Normally, there are none, and the parent still has the same rights as the other parent to the child’s records.

Check the correct box:

  • None: The non-residential parent will have the same rights as the other parent to get the child’s records.
  • Restrictions or limitations: The non-residential parent will have no or limited rights to the child’s records. Explain the limits and the reason for them, like if you have a protection order.

D. Day Care Access Notice

Use this section to explain any limits to the non-residential parent’s access to the child’s day care. Normally there are none.

Check the correct box:

  • None: The non-residential parent will have the same rights as the other parent to access the child’s day care.
  • Restrictions or limitations as follows: The non-residential parent will have no or limited rights to access the child’s day care. Explain the limits and the reason for them, like if you have a protection order.

E. School Activities Access Notice

Use this section to explain any limits to the non-residential parent’s access to the child’s school. Normally there are none.

Check the correct box:

  • None: The non-residential parent will have the same rights as the other parent to access the child’s school activities.
  • Restrictions or limitations as follows: The non-residential parent will have no or limited rights to access the child’s school activities. Explain the limits and the reason for them, like if you have a protection order.
Seventh: Health Insurance Coverage

This section is used to explain who can provide health insurance for each of your children.

Select one (coverage available or unavailable):

  • A. Available to At Least One Parent: At least one of you has a health insurance plan (like through your work) that could cover your child. Check who can provide it:
    • Plaintiff: The parent who filed for separation can provide health insurance for your child.
    • Defendant: The other parent can provide health insurance for your child.
    • Both parents: Both of you could provide health insurance for your child. Check whose plan will be the child’s main health insurance plan.
    • Also check who will provide health insurance for your child:
      • Plaintiff
      • Defendant
      • Both parents
    • Proof of insurance to the: Montgomery County Child Support Enforcement Agency (CSEA)
  • B. Unavailable to Either Parent: Neither of you can provide health insurance for your child. If insurance coverage becomes available to one of you, that parent must notify the Montgomery County Child Support Enforcement Agency (CSEA) and the other parent.

C. Division of Uninsured Expenses

This section is used to explain how you and the other parent will divide excess medical costs that aren’t covered by insurance.

Child support orders include “cash medical support,” or an amount for ordinary medical expenses each year. In 2023, the amount is $388.70 per child. You must explain how you will divide costs that go beyond this amount.

Normally, the extra costs are divided based on each parent’s income.

If you are using the normal way, enter:

  • % Obligor: This is the percentage that will be paid by the person ordered to pay child support. Find the number using the percentages from the child support worksheet line 17 (“income share”).
  • % Obligee: This is the percentage that will be paid by the person receiving child support. Find the number using the percentages from the child support worksheet line 17 (“income share”).

If you agree on a different way, use the following section:

  • Unless otherwise agreed as follows: Explain how you plan to split the extra costs. For example, some parents split them evenly 50/50, meaning 50% Obligor and 50% Obligee.
Eighth: Child Support

This section is used to explain who will owe child support. Child support is set by Ohio law. How much you are ordered to pay is based on your income.

Before you answer the next set of questions, you must find out what the standard support amounts are for your family. Go to the Ohio Child Support Calculator on this site and download the results.

A. Child Support Amount

Give the results of your Child Support Computation Worksheet:

  • Plaintiff, the Obligor: This means the person who filed for separation is the parent ordered to pay child support.
  • Defendant, the Obligor: This means the other person is the parent ordered to pay child support.
  • Amount of $___ per month: This is where to enter the total monthly child support amount from the last line of the Child Support Computation Worksheet.

B. Additional Child Support Information

This section is used to explain how you will divide excess medical costs that go beyond the set amount each year ($388.70 per child in 2023).

Normally, costs beyond this amount are divided based on each parent’s income.

If you are using the normal way, enter:

  • % Obligor: This is the percentage that will be paid by the person ordered to pay child support. Find the number using the percentages from the child support worksheet line 17 (“income share”).
  • % Obligee: This is the percentage that will be paid by the person receiving child support. Find the number using the percentages from the child support worksheet line 17 (“income share”).

If you agree on a different way, use the following section:

  • Unless agreed as follows: Explain how you plan to split the extra costs. For example, some parents split them evenly 50/50, meaning 50% Obligor and 50% Obligee.

C. Child Support Payment

  • Payment shall commence on: Enter the date the child support will start.
  • Administered through: The Montgomery Child Support Enforcement Agency (CSEA) administers child support payments in Montgomery County.

D. Deviation of Child Support Amount

Use this section only if you are requesting something different (a deviation) from your Child Support Computation Worksheet.

  • $___: Enter the amount of child support listed on the last line of your worksheet.
  • Shall be adjusted as follows: Use this section to explain how you want child support to be different.

E. Duration of Child Support

Use this section only if child support will last longer than when the child turns 18.

  • Child support will extend: Checking this box means you and the other parent have agreed to extend child support. Explain your agreement, including how long child support will last.
  • Child(ren) who is/are mentally or physically disabled: Checking this box means one of your children has a mental or physical disability and can’t care for themselves, so child support will last longer. Enter the child’s name and information about their disability.

H. Arrearage

Use this section only if you had temporary orders for child support that is overdue or unpaid.

  • will survive: Checking this box means overdue child support from temporary orders still must be paid, even after the separation is final.
  • will not survive: Checking this box means overdue child support from temporary orders will no longer have to be paid once the separation is final.
  • Other: You can use this section to explain anything else about overdue child support from temporary orders.
Ninth: Tax Exemption

Use this section to explain who can claim each of your children as a dependent for tax purposes. Usually, it’s the parent the child lives with for most of the year.

Income tax dependency exemptions (check all that apply):

  • The Plaintiff: The parent who filed for separation can claim the child as a dependent.
  • The Defendant: The other parent can claim the child as a dependent.
Tenth: Tax Return Options

Use this section to explain whether the two of you have filed your tax returns, who is responsible for any unfiled returns and how you will divide any tax refund payments.

Select a total of four boxes in this section – one for every two statements.

Current Tax Year (usually the same as the calendar year)

Check the box that applies:

  • filed tax returns: You filed your tax returns this tax year.
  • NOT filed tax returns: Your tax returns haven’t been filed this tax year. Explain who is responsible for filing them and when.

Prior Tax Years

Check the box that applies:

  • filed for All Prior tax years: Your tax returns have been filed for past years.
  • NOT filed for All Prior tax years: You didn’t file your tax returns for one or more past year. Explain who is responsible for filing the tax return(s) and when.

Tax Refunds/Deficiencies

Check the box that applies:

  • NO Tax Deficiencies Owing: You don’t owe any taxes, interest or penalties from any past tax returns.
  • Tax Deficiencies Owing: You owe late or unpaid taxes, interest or penalties from one or more past tax returns. Explain who is responsible for paying them and when.

Check the box that applies:

  • NO Tax Refund: You aren’t splitting up the money from a past tax refund as part of your separation.
  • Tax Refund: You are splitting up money from a past tax refund in your separation.
Eleventh: Other Orders

You can use this section to explain anything else that should be part of the separation and hasn't been specifically addressed yet.

Twelfth: Court Costs

This section is used to explain who is responsible for paying Court costs in your case.

Court costs shall be (select one):

  • Taxed to the deposit. Court costs due above the deposit to be paid as follows: This is the most common option. It means Court costs will be taken out of the separation filing fee paid at the start of the case. Also explain who can be billed for extra costs that may come up. Note: If your spouse did not attend a hearing, they can’t be billed for Court costs.
  • Other (specify): This is where to explain anything else about Court costs. If you filed a Poverty Affidavit, note that here.
Thirteenth: Clerk of Courts

The Clerk of Courts will send a copy of the separation judgment entry once it is final. This section is used to explain how the Clerk should send it in your case.

The Clerk of Courts shall provide:

  • a certified copy to: Check the box and enter both of your names for the Clerk of Courts to send both of you a copy of the separation judgment via certified mail.

Whoever completes the final decree should sign in the correct space:

  • Plaintiff signature: This applies if the person who filed for separation also completes the final decree.
  • Defendant signature: This applies if the other person in the separation completes the final decree.
Child Support Computation Worksheet

Go to the Ohio Child Support Calculator on this site and download the results. Attach it with the rest of your forms.

Montgomery County Support Enforcement Agency New Case Number Work Sheet

Enter your information, including:

  • Judge: This is the name of the Judge assigned to your separation case.
  • Custodial Parent/Caretaker Information: This section is used to identify the parent who will receive child support. Circle “(PL)” for Plaintiff if it’s person who filed for separation. Circle (“DF”) for Defendant if it’s the other parent.
  • Absent Parent Information: This section is used to identify the parent who will pay child support.
  • Insured? This section is asking if the person has health insurance. Enter Yes or No.
  • Insurance available? This section is asking if the person has a health insurance plan available, like through work. Enter Yes or No.
  • Uninsured Expenses: This section is used to show how you will divide extra costs not covered by insurance. It’s typically divided by each parent’s income share.
    • Obligee Percentage: This is where to enter the percentage that will be paid by the person who gets support payment.
    • Obligor Percentage: This is where to enter the percentage that will be paid by the person who makes support payments.
  • Child Information: Enter information about each child.
    • Disabled? Does the child have a disability?
    • Pat Est? Has paternity (legal fatherhood) been established for the child?
    • BOW? Was the child born when you weren’t married (or “born out of wedlock”?)

Do not fill out the following fields:

  • Court Order #
  • SETS Case #
  • SEA Case #
  • Date entered into SETS
  • Date Skeleton on COS-E
  • DEO Initials
Standard Order of Parenting Time

Montgomery County has a standard schedule that shows when a child has time with each parent.

Attach the parenting time schedule you are using with the forms you submit to the Court.

Standard Order of Health Care Needs for Dependent Children

Parents are required to cover a child’s health care needs. Montgomery County has a standard order that explains how they will cover those needs.

Attach this form with the packet of forms you submit to the Court.

Obligee's Rights and Remedies for Enforcement of Support

The person who receives child support or spousal support (the “Obligee”) has rights if the other person doesn’t pay.

Attach this form with the packet of forms you submit to the Court.

Submit all documents

Once you have completed the final decree, double check your packet of forms to make sure you have everything.

Your packet should include:

  • Final Decree of Legal Separation (22 pages, plus any extra paper you used)
  • Child Support Computation Worksheet
  • Montgomery County Support Enforcement Agency New Case Number Work Sheet
  • Your Parenting Plan or Shared Parenting Plan
  • Standard Order of Health Care
  • Obligee’s Rights and Remedies

You also may need to include:

  • A copy of the deed to your house
  • A copy of a quit claim deed you are using

When you are done, submit your completed packet of forms to the Court’s Compliance Office for review. Bring your packet in person to Room 261 in the Courthouse.

A Compliance Officer is assigned to you based on the first letter of your last name.

First letter of your last name: Compliance Officer telephone number:

The Compliance Office will contact you after their review is complete. They will tell you if you need to make changes to your forms. Note: They will contact you by phone, so make sure they have your correct phone number.

Follow their instructions and make any changes they tell you to make.

Once your decree is ready for submission, the Compliance Office will submit it to the Judge.

If you haven't submitted any paperwork yet and want to know more about the process, you can contact the Court Navigator at (937)496-7766.